Boxing

Boxing ( pugilism, prize fighting, the sweet science or in Greek pygmachia) is a combat sport in which two people engage in a contest of strength, reflexes, and endurance by throwing punches at an opponent with gloved hands.

Amateur boxing is an Olympic and Commonwealth sport and is a common fixture in most of the major international games – it also has its own World Championships. Boxing is supervised by a referee over a series of one- to three-minute intervals called rounds. The result is decided when an opponent is deemed incapable to continue by a referee, is disqualified for breaking a rule, resigns by throwing in a towel, or is pronounced the winner or loser based on the judges’ scorecards at the end of the contest.

Boxing Style

“Style” is often defined as the strategic approach a fighter takes during a bout. No two fighters’ styles are alike, as it is determined by that individual’s physical and mental attributes. There are main three styles in boxing: Out-fighter (“Boxer”), Brawler (or slugger), and In-fighter (“Swarmer”). These styles may be divided into several special subgroups, such as counter puncher, etc. The main philosophy of the styles is, that each style has an advantage over one, but disadvantage over the other one. It follows the rock-paper-scissors scenario – boxer beats brawler, swarmer beats boxer, and brawler beats swarmer.

Boxer Out Fighter

A classic “boxer” or stylist (also known as an “out-fighter”) seeks to maintain distance between himself and his opponent, fighting with faster, longer range punches, most notably the jab, and gradually wearing his opponent down. Due to this reliance on weaker punches, out-fighters tend to win by point decisions rather than by knockout, though some out-fighters have notable knockout records. They are often regarded as the best boxing strategists due to their ability to control the pace of the fight and lead their opponent, methodically wearing him down and exhibiting more skill and finesse than a brawler Out-fighters need reach, hand speed, reflexes, and footwork.

Boxer-Puncher

A boxer-puncher is a well-rounded boxer who is able to fight at close range with a combination of technique and power, often with the ability to knock opponents out with a combination and in some instances a single shot. Their movement and tactics are similar to that of an out-fighter (although they are generally not as mobile as an out-fighter[citation needed]), but instead of winning by decision, they tend to wear their opponents down using combinations and then move in to score the knockout. A boxer must be well rounded to be effective using this style.

Counter Punchers

Counter punchers are slippery, defensive style fighters who often rely on their opponent’s mistakes in order to gain the advantage whether it be on the score cards or more preferably a knockout. They use their well rounded defense to avoid or block shots and then immediately catch the opponent off guard with a well placed and timed punch. Thus, fighting against counter punchers requires constant feinting and never telegraphing a punch for the counter puncher to generate a good offense from. To be successful using this style they must have good reflexes, intelligence, punch accuracy, and good hand speed. Counter punchers usually will wear their opponents down by making them punch and miss. The opponent will get worn down faster it takes more energy to punch and miss. They usually do not try to stay and fight in the center of the ring with other fighters they would rather pick their opponent apart bit by bit.

Brawler/Slugger

A brawler is a fighter who generally lacks finesse and footwork in the ring, but makes up for it through sheer punching power. Mainly Irish, Irish-American, Mexican, and Mexican-American boxers popularized this style. Many brawlers tend to lack mobility, preferring a less mobile, more stable platform and have difficulty pursuing fighters who are fast on their feet. They may also have a tendency to ignore combination punching in favour of continuous beat-downs with one hand and by throwing slower, more powerful single punches (such as hooks and uppercuts). Their slowness and predictable punching pattern (single punches with obvious leads) often leaves them open to counter punches, so successful brawlers must be able to absorb substantial amounts of punishment. A brawler’s most important assets are power and chin (the ability to absorb punishment while remaining able to continue boxing). Brawlers tend to be very predicable and easy to hit but usually fare well against other fighting styles because they can take punches very well. They also have a higher chance than any other fighting styles to score a knockout against their opponents because they will usually put a large majority of their energy into one punch will, in turn, score a knockout if landed in the right way. Most of the time they focus their training on their upper body instead of their entire body. They also will leave their opponents intimidated because of their power and ability to take a punch.

Swarmer/In-fighter

In-fighters/swarmers (sometimes called “pressure fighters”) attempt to stay close to an opponent, throwing intense flurries and combinations of hooks and uppercuts. A successful in-fighter often needs a good “chin” because swarming usually involves being hit with many jabs before they can maneuver inside where they are more effective. In-fighters operate best at close range because they are generally shorter and have less reach than their opponents and thus are more effective at a short distance where the longer arms of their opponents make punching awkward. However, several fighters tall for their division have been relatively adept at in-fighting as well as out-fighting. The essence of a swarmer is non-stop aggression. Many short in-fighters utilize their stature to their advantage, employing a bob-and-weave defense by bending at the waist to slip underneath or to the sides of incoming punches. Unlike blocking, causing an opponent to miss a punch disrupts his balance, permits forward movement past the opponent’s extended arm and keeps the hands free to counter. A distinct advantage that in-fighters have is when throwing uppercuts where they can channel their entire body weight behind the punch; Mike Tyson was famous for throwing devastating uppercuts. Julio César Chávez was known for his hard “chin”, punching power, body attack and the stalking of his opponents. Some in-fighters, like Mike Tyson, have been known for being notoriously hard to hit. The key to a swarmer is aggression, endurance, chin, and bobbing-and-weaving.

The Dominion Mixed Martial Arts Academy boxing program is now headed by San Antonio native Rocky Ramon. Rocky started boxing in 1972 and was the 1st man to fight 15 rounds against Sugar Ray Leonard and go the distance. Rocky retired with 55 wins, 30 TKO’s and 5 losses.

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